Report on Water, business and human rights In transboundary basins

Water, business and human rights In transboundary basins: Perspectives from the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) and Salween basins

Report on Water, business and human rights In transboundary basins
Paper author: 
Christina Hill
Paper publication date: 
Friday, July 24, 2020

In the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) river basins of Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India and Nepal and the Salween river basin of China, Myanmar and Thailand, millions of people depend on rivers to provide the water that is essential to produce food, ensure their health, secure a livelihood and enjoy cultural practices. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the critical importance of the human rights to sufficient, safe, acceptable, physically accessible and affordable water in preventing people from contracting and spreading disease. Yet unregulated and unsustainable business activity is having serious negative impacts on the health of the GBM and Salween rivers and river basins, and on the lives of the people who depend on them. Bridging the gaps between business and human rights, and water governance practice offers the potential to find some solutions. This, and governments and businesses better meeting their human rights obligations, will have positive outcomes for the environment, and people and their right to water.